Why Attic Vents Should Be Covered In The Winter

Why Attic Vents Should Be Covered In The Winter

Why Attic Vents Should Be Covered In The Winter. Attics help your house release excess heat during the summer months. The attic acts as an intermediate layer. It bars the heat of your sun-drenched roof from the rest of your home. The vents allow the super-heated air to flow out. Then, cooler air from outside sneaks in to replace it. In that way, it keeps your house cooler and your heating bills down.

Vents In Different Climates

Your roof ventilation can increase your energy efficiency during the summer. We discussed that earlier. What we didn’t mention was insulation, sun exposure, and shingle type are exponentially more important factors.

Even if you own an old home that doesn’t have roof vents, installing vents may not be your best option. There are other, lower-risk, cost-effective ways to decrease your home’s cooling bills. Air vents are necessary for cold climates. You see, the colder your climate, the higher the chance your home will benefit from ventilation. The colder it gets, the more you’ll have to contend with condensation. And condensation can be a home destroyer.

If your attic already has ventilation, it doesn’t have the high-rated rigid insulation you need for a closed attic. This insulation prevents condensation from seeping into your roof sheathing. It can cause mold, mildew, and even roof seepage. Take into consideration how dew forms on the grass in the morning when cool, moist air hits warm sunlight. The warm air from your ceiling causes the same effect.

Over time, this condensation can cost tens of thousands of dollars in damage. Worse yet, black mold can have severe health consequences. That includes everything from allergies to pulmonary hemorrhages. It’s well worth it to keep those vents open and keep moisture out during the winter.

The loss of gain of heat in your attic is only marginally affected by your vents. We mentioned this earlier. Your insulation is hands down the determining factor in how well your attic retains heat. If you want to save money on your winter heating bills, replace your insulation with a newer, heavy-duty option.

But be sure to check with an expert to make sure it’s the right kind. Getting the wrong kind of insulation can create as many problems as it fixes. In general, your furnace should not be heating your attic. Whether you keep your vents open or closed will have a negligible effect on your power bill, but it’s sure to affect condensation.

Rooftop air vents are meant to be kept open year-round. They take little to no maintenance, but that doesn’t mean you should never check on them. In order to keep your family safe, routinely check your entire home to make sure it’s in good running condition. Use a maintenance checklist to ensure you don’t forget anything. This winter, start in the attic and make sure your vents are open. Then, check your furnace to make certain it’s functioning and/or your chimney to make sure it’s clear of debris. Then check the seals of all your doors and windows.

How Much Attic Ventilation Do You Need?

Just as you would size a furnace or air conditioner for your home, you also size your attic. You want a precise amount of ventilation to keep your home properly heated and cooled. If you have too much or too little, you’ll end up with energy inefficiency and moisture problems.

The same can be said of roof ventilation. Just as with space, too much or too little space will cause major problems.

Roof vents create additional access points for moisture to seep in and leaks to occur. Some vents are necessary. But if you needlessly increase your roof penetrations, you run greater risks:

●  Moisture damage

●  Higher cooling bills

●  Blowouts during strong winds

●  Sparks entering and causing a fire

So, how do you know how much ventilation you need? Without exception, speak to a professional contractor or architect. In general, homes need a ratio of 1:300.

For every 300 square feet of ceiling, you want 1 square foot of ventilation in your attic. Other factors to include are resistance and interference from things like grates, which impede airflow. That means that your entire vent opening doesn’t count as ventilated space.

Contact Neo Attic Solutions to schedule a free, no-obligation consultation. We can look into your attic and crawl spaces to identify what if anything would make a difference for your comfort and peace of mind.

Schedule a FREE INSPECTION today!